Mariposa County High School Home

Principal

Celeste Azevedo

 

cazevedo@mariposa.k12.ca.us

742-0260, ext. 222

Assistant Principal

Doug Jensen

jensen.jpg

djensen@mariposa.k12.ca.us

742-0260, ext. 261

Personnel

 

Expected School wide Learning Results

Students at Mariposa County High School gain the resources to fuel their future. MCHS students:

Further intellectual curiosity as responsible, self-reliant members of the MCHS community. Students are active participants in the learning process.

Utilize technology. Students are managers of information who are able to analyze and synthesize data. Students adapt to new technologies as they become available.

Embrace learning as a gateway to their future. Students prepare for life after high school by setting goals to access higher education opportunities and career choices.

Learn what it means to be productive citizens in an increasingly global society of diverse cultures and customs. Students are environmentally conscientious, socially responsible citizens.

History of Mariposa County High School

1914

"On August 25th, 1914 a special election was held for the purpose of determining whether or not Mariposa county was to have a high school. The election carried with a vote of 655 in favor and 608 against the high school. This did not include Mariposa's vote, for, owing to some minor irregularity, the vote of this precinct, which was 201 to 36 in favor of the high school, was not recorded in the official ballet."

"The permanent location of the high school in Mariposa county was established at a meeting of the Board of Education on April 24, 1914. Mr. Dexter, County Superintendent, was appointed to make arrangements for procuring a teacher for the new high school. Fortunately for the future of the school, Professor L. A. Offield, for several years principal of the Santa Clara High School, was elected to fill the position of principal."

"On the 19th of October, 1914, twelve representatives of the youth of Mariposa assembled at the Presbyterian Church building in search of the knowledge or diversion, as the case may be. The equipment was meager, the classrooms were as numerous as the faculty, and the ignorance of the students was great. But the lacking of martial resources was made up for in enthusiasm and perseverance. As the novelty wore off some of the less serious students dropped out, but others took their places, and their loss didn't vitally affect the process of the school." "DORHTEY ROWLAND" (18) 1914.

1937

"Our move into the new school has been a great advantage to both the students and the faculty. It has made teaching a great deal easier."

 

"Every room is supplied with the necessary conveniences that we did not have in the old school. Telephones connected with the office are in each room. There is plenty of closet space, blackboard space, and steam heist. A new system of ringing the bells also has been arrange. The ten minute bell for shop and boy's gym period, is rung loudly and the bells in the various rooms are soft tone bells."

 

"The auditorium is very large with a slanting floor, and will seat four hundred people. It has a large attractive stage with rust-colored curtain, and orchestra pit."

"One of the outstanding features of our new school is the auditorium."

 

"The lighting system is especially arranged so that if the electricity is cut off the lights automatically switch over on to batteries giving light all the time..."

 

This text was in the first page of the 1937 year book after they got the new school.

1951

Our new Gym was built in 1949-50. It is in the place where the old school site was. Before the gym was a gym, the original building was cut in half and used for an Ag room for the students. In 1951 the Ag room burned down and was then torn apart. A gym was going to be constructed where the old Pine Tag school was.